Commissions

Berlin Science Week with Light Art Space

Posted on: October 6th, 2020 by libby

 

What can quantum science teach us about the way we make sense of our world?

A talk with Berlin-based Light Art Space for Berlin Science Week.

Libby Heaney is a London-based artist, researcher and physicist whose practice connects quantum physics, machine learning and our environment through performance, Virtual Reality and participatory experience. She makes use of new technologies such as artificial intelligence to question the machine's forms of categorisation and expand technology beyond its predominant purpose. On the occasion of Berlin Science Week 2020, Heaney delivers a talk on the uses of quantum computing, its controversies and potential applications in society.

What are quantum computers and how do they depend on quantum physics? Why are corporations and governments interested in quantum computing? What can quantum science teach us about the way we make sense of our world? In what way can the discipline impact how we tell stories, build meaning and create art?

In this lecture, Heaney gives insight into quantum computing and the challenges it holds for the future of making art. Her talk is followed by discussions with philosopher Professor Jenann Ismael and quantum scientist Professor Vlatko Vedral. Together, they will explore the impact quantum physics can have on our day-to-day-reality when transposed from the micro to the macro world.

This talk conveys the core subject matter of a new work being developed by the artist and commissioned by Light Art Space (LAS), for which Heaney uses IBM’s cloud-based Q System One quantum computers. Art can acquire the tools to rupture causality by following the tenets of quantum science, which creates a space where entities – human, non-human, machine – relate, interfere and entangle.

Livestream
5 Nov 2020, 6 PM
Berlin Science Week 2020

 

This project extends Libby's recent artistic research into machine learning and identity into the realm of non-humans. It brings together elements examined in Top of the Bots & Britbot, including cross-class contact, expressions of solidarity, notions of identity and the power of collective singing. Libby will be working with academics at Loughborough University as part of the Radar Residency to come up with an expanded definition of chanting based on energy and  information exchange across ecosystems (without anthropomorphising). Using various mics and online databases, she will record/create a dataset of human and nonhuman chanting and will then train an AI on the dataset. Exploring the act of chanting across the biosphere, Libby will look at what it means to include nonhumans in the hope that alternative expressions of human Libby non-human collective identity will emerge.

The funding will enable collaboration with curator Laura Purseglove and sound artist Matt Lewis and also with musician Nabihah Iqbal who will perform in call & response event with the AI trained on 'chanting' in churches in Loughborough and London.

Radar Residency at Loughborough University

Posted on: October 9th, 2019 by libby

 

Libby has started a research residency as part of Loughborough University's contemporary art programme Radar.

Inspired by the theme of 'Risk', Libby will work with researchers from social sciences and computer science to explore risk in creating a new performance with machine learning, while also thinking about mitigating risk by encountering 'the other' in human and non-human systems. The performance will explore notions of chanting, through it's material properties, across the biosphere and will place singer Nabihah Iqbal (Ninja Tunes) into dialogue with an AI bot.

Radar is LU Arts’ commissioning and research programme. They invite artists to produce new work in response to and as part of research undertaken across Loughborough University’s two campuses, and programme events bringing together artistic and academic work. The work they commission is process-led, frequently participatory, and takes place both in the public realm and across our campuses.

 

 

Libby Heaney's on going artistic research into machine learning, identity and pop culture has been awarded an Arts Council England National Lottery Project Grant. The first stage of the research concerning artificial intelligence and karaoke will be presented in June at London's Art Night, which will take place across Kings Cross and Walthamstow. The second stage of research will involve two workshops with young people exploring identity and machine learning at Birmingham Open Media (BOM) in October. A final performance of the Arts Council funded stage of this project will take place at BOM in November as part of a series of events to celebrate the gallery's 5th birthday.

Art Night is London’s largest free contemporary art festival. Each year the festival partners with a leading cultural institution and/or independent curator, focusing on a different area of London to explore its distinctive identity, culture and architecture through various forms of art.

Arts Council England is a non-departmental public body of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport. They champion, develop and invest in artistic and cultural experiences that enrich people's lives.

BOM is a centre for art, technology and science dedicated to creative innovation with purpose. The gallery presents cutting edge digital artworks and exhibitions that spark debate about technology and scientific progress.BOM is dedicated to positive social impact in all that they do, with exhibitions and events exploring topical issues in digital culture and science which impact on human lives.

Arts Council England Project Grant Award

Posted on: October 9th, 2018 by libby

 

Libby has won an Arts Council England Project Grant for her Sky Arts commission Britbot.

Britbot www.britbot.org is a net-based artwork exploring British identity. It is a voice and text activated chatbot that speaks to people about the topics in the UK government’s citizenship test and gradually learns from what they say. It will be online from Jul 18 to early Jan 19. The ACE funding is for a dedicated social media marketer to use Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to engage people who wouldn’t usually interact with art, particularly from towns, rural communities and suburbs across England. The aim is to gain a wider understanding of ‘Britishness’ today.

Arts Council England champion, develop and invest in artistic and cultural experiences that enrich people's lives. They support activities across the arts, museums and libraries – from theatre to digital art, reading to dance, music to literature, and crafts to collections.

Sky Arts 50 commission

Posted on: October 26th, 2017 by libby

 

Libby has been awarded a commission for a new artwork by Sky Arts 50.

Sky Arts launched Art 50 to invite artists of all kinds, from all walks of life, from all artistic genres, to create a piece of work which says something important about what it will mean to be British after we leave the European Union.

What will Britain look like, feel like, be like to live in, when we are no longer members of the European Union? The outcome of the Brexit referendum has stimulated a widespread debate about our national identity, with many people looking to express how they feel about our nation as we approach a future outside the EU.

Sky Arts are working with our partner organisations; the Barbican, Sage Gateshead and BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art. They will be hosting a festival featuring a selection of the Art 50 commissions as well as being on the judging panel.