Latest News

Next generation story-telling: AI and language

Posted on: November 24th, 2019 by libby

 

On Tuesday, Libby will join Luba Elliott, Ross Godwin and Pietro Gagliano to explore new forms of story-telling utilizing machine learning and other artificial intelligence systems. The workshop, held in Manchester's People's History Museum, is hosted by The Space.org and asks the question: How can AI and machine learning be harnessed as creative tools to help artists, writers, poets, film and theatre makers create compelling narratives and experiences for the audiences of the future?

The Space helps artists and organisations make great art and reach new audiences digitally. Theycommission projects, develop skills and find audiences.

"AI and machine learning are no longer futuristic technologies but are being increasingly integrated into our everyday lives; used to help us access creative content, from image and video content, to music, radio and podcasts. Artists, writers and organisations are already exploring whether AI can help them develop new creative worlds for people to discover but as a cultural sector there is nothing like the widespread interest and uptake there is in immersive technologies. The Space is interested in exploring what some of the potential barriers to adoption are and how we might facilitate creative access to these powerful new technologies."

The Challenge of Deepfakes on BBC World Service

Posted on: October 28th, 2019 by libby

 

Libby spoke to BBC World Service correspondent Joshua Thorpe about her artistic practice involving deep fakes. You can listen to this episode of World Business Report here.

The BBC World Service is the world's largest international broadcaster, which broadcasts radio news, speech and discussions in more than 40 languages to many parts of the world on analogue and digital shortwave platforms, internet streaming, podcasting, satellite, DAB, FM and MW relays.

 

This project extends Libby's recent artistic research into machine learning and identity into the realm of non-humans. It brings together elements examined in Top of the Bots & Britbot, including cross-class contact, expressions of solidarity, notions of identity and the power of collective singing. Libby will be working with academics at Loughborough University as part of the Radar Residency to come up with an expanded definition of chanting based on energy and  information exchange across ecosystems (without anthropomorphising). Using various mics and online databases, she will record/create a dataset of human and nonhuman chanting and will then train an AI on the dataset. Exploring the act of chanting across the biosphere, Libby will look at what it means to include nonhumans in the hope that alternative expressions of human Libby non-human collective identity will emerge.

The funding will enable collaboration with curator Laura Purseglove and sound artist Matt Lewis and also with musician Nabihah Iqbal who will perform in call & response event with the AI trained on 'chanting' in churches in Loughborough and London.

Quantum Computing and Art at Sonar – Video of Talk

Posted on: October 9th, 2019 by libby

 

In this talk, which was held at Sonar+D 2019 and moderated by Wired's Victoria Turk, three quantum scientists -Holly Cummings, Artur Garcia Saez and artist Libby Heaney - explain the processes behind the quantum computing revolution and explore what the leap in computing power will mean for creativity in the not so distant future.

You can watch the talk on YouTube here.

Radar Residency at Loughborough University

Posted on: October 9th, 2019 by libby

 

Libby has started a research residency as part of Loughborough University's contemporary art programme Radar.

Inspired by the theme of 'Risk', Libby will work with researchers from social sciences and computer science to explore risk in creating a new performance with machine learning, while also thinking about mitigating risk by encountering 'the other' in human and non-human systems. The performance will explore notions of chanting, through it's material properties, across the biosphere and will place singer Nabihah Iqbal (Ninja Tunes) into dialogue with an AI bot.

Radar is LU Arts’ commissioning and research programme. They invite artists to produce new work in response to and as part of research undertaken across Loughborough University’s two campuses, and programme events bringing together artistic and academic work. The work they commission is process-led, frequently participatory, and takes place both in the public realm and across our campuses.

 

 

Top of the Bots: Resurrection is a new version of the on-going Top of the Bots series of performance/AI based artworks, the first of which was exhibited at Art Night London early this year. Top of the Bots is funded by Art Council England and considers the aesthetics and functioning of artificial intelligent algorithms to create live experiences that question our consumption of celebrities and our relations to each other.

The power of group singing in karaoke, imperfections in voice and individual vulnerability are used to explore alternative expressions of collective identity. Top of the Bots: Resurrection asks what it means to resurrect icons of western music while questioning notions of truth and labour.

Top of the Bots: Resurrection will be presented at September 27th's Tate Late in the Tate Exchange at the Tate Modern.

The Tate Exchange is place for all to play, create, reflect and question what art can mean to our everyday.

Hyphen-Labs is an international collective working at the intersection of technology, art, science, and the future. Through their global vision and multi-disciplinary backgrounds they are driven to create engaging ways to explore planetary-centered design. In the process they challenge conventions and stimulate conversations, placing collective needs and experiences at the center of evolving narratives.

Machine Learning Matters talk at Somerset House

Posted on: June 30th, 2019 by libby

 

James Nissen with a 40 x 80 cm ion-beam etched multilayer dielectric grating 1780 lines/mm

Artist Libby Heaney spoke about her recent artistic practice exploring the intersections of machine learning, pop culture and identity at Somerset House's (Inter-) event. Using the concept of diffraction as a pivot to explore her artworks Britbot, Euro(re)vision, Oh Brian and Top of the Bots, Heaney drew on feminist theories and quantum science to unpick identities and deconstruct limiting categories usually enforced by machine learning algorithms.

(Inter-) is a 2-day programme of installations, presentations, panel discussions and live performances exploring image, sound and digital art. Saturday’s programme opens with discussion and presentations exploring the politics of virtual and physical architectures and the new ways of queering digital.

Somerset House Studios is an experimental workspace in the centre of London connecting artists, makers and thinkers with audiences. Located inside the repurposed former Inland Revenue building, the Studios offer space and support to artists pushing bold ideas, engaging with urgent issues and pioneering new technologies.

 

Libby Heaney's on going artistic research into machine learning, identity and pop culture has been awarded an Arts Council England National Lottery Project Grant. The first stage of the research concerning artificial intelligence and karaoke will be presented in June at London's Art Night, which will take place across Kings Cross and Walthamstow. The second stage of research will involve two workshops with young people exploring identity and machine learning at Birmingham Open Media (BOM) in October. A final performance of the Arts Council funded stage of this project will take place at BOM in November as part of a series of events to celebrate the gallery's 5th birthday.

Art Night is London’s largest free contemporary art festival. Each year the festival partners with a leading cultural institution and/or independent curator, focusing on a different area of London to explore its distinctive identity, culture and architecture through various forms of art.

Arts Council England is a non-departmental public body of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport. They champion, develop and invest in artistic and cultural experiences that enrich people's lives.

BOM is a centre for art, technology and science dedicated to creative innovation with purpose. The gallery presents cutting edge digital artworks and exhibitions that spark debate about technology and scientific progress.BOM is dedicated to positive social impact in all that they do, with exhibitions and events exploring topical issues in digital culture and science which impact on human lives.

Art AI festival and conference

Posted on: May 30th, 2019 by libby

 

Libby exhibited her machine learning artwork Britbot at Art AI festival in Leicester from 16th - 31st May. She spoke about her practice and the artwork at the State of the AI-Art conference exploring creative practice with AI. You can watch part of the interview and talk here.

Oh Brian at Her Voice, Institute of Contemporary Arts

Posted on: April 24th, 2019 by libby

 

Oh Brian was presented at the Her Voice event at the Institute of Contemporary Arts.

Her Voice examines ideas such as: How might we test mainstream notions of agency and subjectivity, manifest alternative productions of knowledge and power, and acquire new understandings about what it is to be female – or, even, what it is to be human – under the spell of ‘her voice’?

The Institute of Contemporary Arts in London supports radical art and culture through a vibrant programme of exhibitions, films, events, talks and debates.